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diy fabric pots

DIY Fabric Pots

I saw some lovely fabric pots on Instagram the other day and was instantly inspired to make some of my own!

Materials:

  • Exterior fabric (I used faux leather and a tribal print cotton)
  • Interior fabric (I used rain-resistant fabric, but anything plastic like, shower resistant or water resistant would work)
  • Sewing Machine

Now you will need to figure out the size of your fabric pot. Most of my plants are in pots that are about 12cm in diameter so I made all the fabric pots slightly larger than this.

I created these pots using two methods. I will be showing you both.

Method 1:

Above you’ll see that I’ve cut the interior and exterior fabrics.

You will notice that the waterproof fabric is much shorter than the exterior fabric. This is so that I can fold the exterior fabric over and sew everything into place.

I’ve made the round bottoms about 14cm in diameter and the rectangular pieces about 40cm in length. The heights will vary depending on what method you are using to make the pot and how high your pots are.

  1. Fold each rectangular piece in half (right sides facing each other) and sew the side seams.
  2. Pin the circles onto the corresponding rectangular pieces (right sides facing each other) and sew in place.
  3. Turn the interior fabric right side out and place it onto the exterior fabric (wrong sides together).
  4. Pin the interior and exterior together at the top.
  5. Fold the exterior over and fold the raw seams under.
  6. Pin the fold in place and then sew.

Note: When pinning the water resistant fabric, remember to pin within the seams so that there are no holes on the final piece and any holes are hidden. If you want your pot to be super water resistant, pencil in some glue around the sewed edges on the wrong side. This will close up the gap between the fabrics.

Turn the whole thing right side out and you’re done!

Method 2:

In this method the only difference is that the interior and exterior rectangles don’t differ in height and the last step is different.

As you can see, I’ve attached the water proof fabric to the faux leather for the interior side so that when everything is put together you will see the faux leather and not the water proof fabric when looking at the pot from above.

  1. Fold each rectangular piece in half (right sides facing each other) and sew the side seams.
  2. Pin the circles onto the corresponding rectangular pieces (right sides facing each other) and sew in place.
  3. Place one piece into the other (right sides together).
  4. Sew all along the top of the pot, leaving a gap that will be large enough to pull eveyrthing through after.
  5. Pull everythign through the gap so that it looks like the image above.
  6. Push the interior piece back into the exterior piece and close up the gap by hand.

Note: When pinning the water resistant fabric and leather, remember to pin within the seams so that there are no holes on the final piece and any holes are hidden. If you want your pot to be super water resistant, pencil in some glue around the sewed edges on the wrong side. This will close up the gap between the fabrics.

Once you’ve come up with a pattern that you like, it’s so simple to make one in every fabric and one for every plant in the home!

Note that these pots are not completely water proof, just water resistant. Even if you get water resistant fabic, there are still holes in the fabric from where you’ve sewed and there is always possibilities for water to seep through. I water the plants while they are still in the fabric pot, but I am very aware of how much water goes in because I don’t want it to pool inside. To be safe, I’d say you should take your plants out before watering them and have it drain properly before placing them back in.

I saw some lovely fabric pots on Instagram the other day and was instantly inspired to make some of my own! Materials: Exterior fabric (I used faux

Tater Totes: DIY fabric pots for potatoes & other plants

A good friend purchased cloth grow bags for her potato planting a few years ago. Being a frugal fixer (tightwad, penny-pincher, etc.), I thought I could make the same thing using a roll of old landscape cloth and my sewing machine for much less than she had paid. To my surprise, not only did they work beautifully, but I am still using them! Here is my “Tater Totes” tale and tips on non-sewing versions for others to consider!

Tater Container Concept

Potato plants form their tubers close to the soil surface which means they need to be shielded from the sun to keep from turning toxic green and inedible, thus the traditional “hilling up” around the plants. The hilling process can be backbreaking and there is a potential of damaging a few forming spuds. Planting potatoes in a container with little soil and lots of mulch keep the plants happy and the spuds covered.

NOTE: I do not have much soil to spare in my little yard, but I can always find some type of mulch, like shredded leaves, sawdust, hay, straw, and even bags of office-shredded paper (which I have used more than once). Those using straw bale gardening (DG forum for subscribed members) have found that potato plants love growing in the previous year’s semi-composted straw (or hay) and it is perfect to mulch with, too.

My friend Pam and I prefer containers for potatoes, mainly because there is no digging to harvest. We just dump the containers and the taters fall out at our feet. There is the benefit of constant peeking to see how the little taters are doing, as well as, easy potato robbing around mid-season without harming the plant! And the composted mulch is added back to the garden beds. We have grown potatoes in the ground, raised beds, various containers, and stacked tires, so fabric grow bags sounded like a great idea.

Fabric Grow Bags

When fabric is used as a container, excess water easily drains away, unlike a hard surface container with a few drain holes. The cloth also allows good air circulation to prevent root rot that can sometimes take out an entire in-ground potato crop during a cold wet planting season. The roots will grow through the fabric and into the ground. The small roots growing through the side of the bags are essentially air-pruned, preventing the plant from becoming root-bound like a hard container.

Growing potatoes in a cloth sack is a similar concept to growing them in stacked tires. I add a little soil and manure to cover the seed potato, and then mulch (some may prefer more soil). Instead of adding tires as the plants grow, the bags are unrolled, as more mulch is needed. The process continues until the bag is completely unrolled.

The Tater Totes (or any cloth containers) are much easier to deal with than tires. They drain water more easily, allow better air circulation, are lightweight, and store folded in a drawer until the next season! I have, also, picked up my planted Totes to run from equipment during a yard project (baby backhoes need more room than you think). You cannot do that with heavy containers of soil or a stack of tires!

Tater Tote Tips

On a whim, I created a how-to on the construction of my Tater Totes on the Instructables web site that immediately became a “Featured Instructable” (I was so proud)! If you would like more information about how the Totes are constructed and see additional photos of the planted Totes, please take a look at the slide show video (1:43 minutes).

Viewer comments offered excellent ideas for reusing fabric feed sacks, recycled shopping bags, burlap sacks, and blue jeans in lieu of the landscape fabric.

NOTE: Be wary of shopping bags created and printed with lead-based inks/paint, especially those manufactured outside the United States.

Although the Tater Tote design and use has changed a little, the concept is still the same.

See the Bag Gardens how-to (PDF file) using Hessian sacks from the Send a Cow charity.

A good friend purchased cloth grow bags for her potato planting a few years ago. Being a frugal fixer (tightwad, penny-pincher, etc.), I thought I could make the same thing using a roll of old land…