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Suncourt 10 in. 2-Speed Inductor Inline Duct Fan with Electrical Box

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Product Overview

The Inductor 10 in. Inline Duct Fan keeps you comfortable year round and improves the efficiency of your heating and cooling system. Connect either high or low speed in the provided electrical box for the fan speed you require. This corrosion resistant fan fits 10 in. flexible and rigid ducts and features a crimp and bead design on both ends for easy installation. The thermally protected Class B motor will not overheat and is built to be quiet and dependable for years to come.

  • Fan is designed to efficiently boost airflow; when used as a booster fan the maximum boost CFM is 900, free air CFM is 300/460
  • For best performance and most quiet operation, it is recommended that you install your inline duct fan 6 ft. to 8 ft. from the register
  • Can be installed at any angle
  • Engineered for maximum boost and quiet operation
  • Do not expose your inductor inline duct fan to temperatures above 140
  • Thermally protected class B motor, 135 running Watt, 1.70 startup Amp, 120 VAC, 60 Hz

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1-year Limited Warranty

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Suncourt 10 in. 2-Speed Inductor Inline Duct Fan with Electrical Box Log in for product availability. Static: A Static Favorites List is created by adding items to your list from Search

Using Duct and Register Booster Fans to Increase HVAC Circulation

If the heating and cooling in your home is uneven and hard to regulate, cheap — but imperfect — duct and register booster fans may help.

If your house has notoriously cold spots during winter, or uncomfortably warm rooms in summer — even when your HVAC is working fine — the culprit may be your ductwork.

Twists and turns in ducts, along with long spans of ductwork, conspire to restrict air flow. While some parts of your house seem cozy, others may suffer from a lack of heated or cooled air from your HVAC system.

The problem is usually worse in older homes with ducts that weren’t designed to handle modern heating and cooling systems.

How Booster Fans Help

Booster fans are add-ons that help move air through ducts. While inline duct and register booster fans will not cure underlying defects, they can “boost” air flow, thus increasing the amount of cold and warm air that ultimately makes it to a room.

First, Check the Basics

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Inspect your HVAC system for problems that might be contributing to airflow and efficiency problems. Dirty filters, peeling duct tape, and obstructed air returns all can decrease HVAC performance.

Types of HVAC Booster Fans

Register booster fans are the most economical and simplest to install. These plug-and-play units replace your existing floor, wall, or ceiling register. They mount flush to the surface, plug into the wall outlet, and feature a modest internal fan that goes on and off when the HVAC system kicks in. Some feature a thermostat and multi-speed fan.

Prices range from $30 for a basic unit up to $80 for those with digital thermostats, multi-speed fans, and remote control.

Inline duct fans are cylindrical fans that replace a section of ductwork. That means your HVAC ducting must be exposed to work on it. Though some units simply plug in, most are hardwired and require a relay back to the furnace that tells the unit when to switch on. Installation may require an electrician.

Inline duct fans are quieter than register booster fans, but you’ll have to know the size and shape of your existing ductwork so you can pick the right-sized unit.

Count on paying $30 to $200 for an inline booster fan, plus a couple hundred dollars for the electrician.

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A Word of Caution From a Pro

“The biggest challenge is the return air — getting the stale air from the second or third floor back down to the furnace to be heated or cooled and redistributed,” explains Tom Hutchinson, president of Hutchinson Plumbing Heating Cooling.

“While cost-effective, we don’t see that booster fans provide a whole lot of success in remedying the problem,” explains Hutchinson. “The best solution is adding returns or installing a thermostatically controlled zone system.”

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Douglas Trattner

Douglas Trattner has covered home improvement for HGTV.com, DIYNetworks, and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He lives in a 1925 Colonial.

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Read how duct booster fans, like inline duct and register fans, can help improve the efficiency and airflow of your HVAC. Learn about the pros, cons and costs.