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How to Transplant Morning Glories to a Bigger Pot

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Morning glories, a variety of flowers in the genus Ipomoea, outgrow their containers quickly. They thrive in U.S. Department of Agriculture zones 5 through 8. Provide a trellis to allow this fast-growing plant a place to climb. While the plant itself is hardy, the morning glory’s root system is delicate, so take care not to disturb the roots when transplanting.

Fill a large flowerpot with potting soil, leaving about 2 inches of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot. Morning glories grow quickly, so choose a pot about twice the diameter of the plant’s current home.

Place a store-bought or homemade trellis in the center of the pot. Insert it deep enough that the soil holds it firmly in place. A couple of branches about 1 inch in diameter will work as a homemade trellis.

Remove your morning glory and most of its soil from its pot. Morning glories do not like their root ball disturbed, so leave the soil around the roots intact when moving the plant. Run your trowel around the edge of the pot if the soil is stuck inside.

Dig a hole in the center of the new pot large enough to accommodate the morning glory’s roots and soil. Place the root ball directly in front of the trellis so the plant can begin climbing.

Pack soil gently around the plant’s stem. The soil should not be packed so tightly that water will not run through it.

Add enough water to the pot to moisten the soil without having water running out of the pot’s drainage holes, as morning glories prefer moist but not saturated soil.

How to Transplant Morning Glories to a Bigger Pot. Morning glories, a variety of flowers in the genus Ipomoea, outgrow their containers quickly. They thrive in U.S. Department of Agriculture zones 5 through 8. Provide a trellis to allow this fast-growing plant a place to climb. While the plant itself is hardy, the …

Morning glory pot display

Find out how to grow morning glory in a pot.

Plant is not at its best in January

Plant is not at its best in February

Plant is not at its best in March

Plant is not at its best in April

Plant is not at its best in May

Plant is at its best in June

Plant is at its best in July

Plant is at its best in August

Plant is not at its best in September

Plant is not at its best in October

Plant is not at its best in November

Plant is not at its best in December

Do not To do in January

Do not To do in February

Do not To do in March

Do not To do in April

Do To do in May

Do To do in June

Do not To do in July

Do not To do in August

Do not To do in September

Do not To do in October

Do not To do in November

Do not To do in December

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Each blue or magenta flower of ipomoea, the morning glory, lasts just one day, but it blooms reliably throughout the summer. The dense mat of heart-shaped leaves provide a perfect backdrop for the cheery flowers.

You Will Need

  • Ipomoea ‘Purple Haze’ (4)
  • 48cm urn or similar sized pot
  • Willow plant support
  • Multi-purpose, peat-free compost

Step 1

Add crocks to the base of the container to aid drainage, then fill two-thirds with compost.

Step 2

Position the plants 15cm apart and firm the compost around them, removing air pockets. Place the willow support carefully over the climbers. Push the legs firmly into the compost, ensuring the structure is even by checking the support’s bands are horizontal. Water the plants thoroughly.

Step 3

As the plants begin to flower, feed them weekly with a potash-rich feed such as tomato feed, to boost flowering potential.

Create an annual climber pot display with morning glory, with expert gardening advice from BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine.