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Seeds of the Word: Finding God in the Culture

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Since the first century, Christians have detected “seeds of the Word” in the surrounding culture. No matter how charred or distorted the fragments, we can always uncover inklings of the Gospel, which can then lead people to God. Through this evocative collection of essays, Bishop Robert Barron finds those “seeds” in today’s most popular films, books, and current events.

How do Superman, Gran Torino, and The Hobbit illuminate the figure of Jesus? How does Bob Dylan convey the prophetic overtones of Jeremiah and Isaiah? Where can we detect the ripple of original sin in politics, sports, and the Internet culture?

Finding the “seeds of the Word” requires a new vision. This book will train you to see.

Foreword from Cardinal Timothy Dolan.

“Barron is an exceptional evangelizer and one of the best at finding connections between twenty-first century culture and the timeless teachings of Catholicism.”

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York

Publisher: Word on Fire
Page Count: 288
ISBN: 978-0988524590
Publication Date: March 16, 2015

Ordering from CANADA? Click HERE! Since the first century, Christians have detected “seeds of the Word" in the surrounding culture. No matter how charred or distorted the fragments, we can always uncover inklings of the Gospel, which can then lead people to God. Through this evocative collection of essays, Bishop Rober

Seeds of the Word: Finding God in the Culture

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If Goodreads would allow, I’d give Seeds of the Word two and a half stars instead of three.

Barron is thoroughly pastoral–not a bad thing for a pastor. The way he give a spiritual lesson from “Moneyball” or attest to the gospel through “World War Z” is always engaging and insightful. As the book progresses, Barron is less charitable to cultural artifacts, and instead of finding positive examples in culture, he mines the West for its worse. In these negative examples, Barron comes off as less in If Goodreads would allow, I’d give Seeds of the Word two and a half stars instead of three.

Barron is thoroughly pastoral–not a bad thing for a pastor. The way he give a spiritual lesson from “Moneyball” or attest to the gospel through “World War Z” is always engaging and insightful. As the book progresses, Barron is less charitable to cultural artifacts, and instead of finding positive examples in culture, he mines the West for its worse. In these negative examples, Barron comes off as less insightful and more Dreher-esque. The book’s organization, ending in much more sex and marriage talk than it started, adds to the potential “Benedict-option” feel. Yet, even in this more downtrodden, anti-postmodern part of the book, Barron still has his moments. About every third article from the final section on culture is still about as wonderful as his writings on film in the beginning. I especially appreciate the liturgical analysis of the Chicago skyline.

The book doesn’t benefit much from being a collection. Barron repeats himself, his ideas, and even his rants, and it becomes clear that the articles were never edited to work better as a collection. A simple five minute re-read of each article could have fixed this small problem and made the book more enjoyable.

If you’re looking for some interesting Christian musings (and I mean musings) on culture, I recommend Barron–just maybe speed through the final section. . more

As some have noted, most of these bite-sized essays are available on Bishop Barron’s Word On Fire website. But “bite sized” and “brief” does not mean “lacking in substance.” These are tasty morsels worth chewing on. In each essay, Barron is excellent at communicating succinctly what’s at stake philosophically and theologically. He’s also a good example of how, within reason, one is able to develop the ability to read almost anything through an orthodox Catholic lens. Barron’s two great heroes ar As some have noted, most of these bite-sized essays are available on Bishop Barron’s Word On Fire website. But “bite sized” and “brief” does not mean “lacking in substance.” These are tasty morsels worth chewing on. In each essay, Barron is excellent at communicating succinctly what’s at stake philosophically and theologically. He’s also a good example of how, within reason, one is able to develop the ability to read almost anything through an orthodox Catholic lens. Barron’s two great heroes are St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Irenaeus, and their insights and their implications are very much on display here. In addition, anyone who doubts Barron’s orthodoxy– often because he doesn’t take up their pet causes or peeves at times of their choosing– should read this book.

I also managed to get this book for free, although I paid for shipping and handling. Even though most of these are available prior to the release of the book, I however, liked not only the convenience of their being collated in book form but their having a table of contents that grouped thematically. I also tend to be one of those people who annotates everything I read, with notes in the margin that include my thoughts and references to other reading. What’s more, I tend to annotate the table of contents, also, with comments on what particular themes any of these essays is good at illustrating.

So the usefulness of Seeds of the Word isn’t just in the content. It’s the way it provides a lay of the land. . more

Morality in every day words

What more would you like to see and read about of what the world’s thinking on morality today, in films, books, and every day happenings then discussed in an easy to comprehend manner by Robert Barron. You will not find a reference manual to get answers to defend why we need correct moral thinking in today’s world than Barrron’s pieces. It is easy reading and hopefully well read,we need it today. I highly recommend this book.

Excellent. This collection of essays, some of which I’d already read online, really opened my eyes to how I can better interpret the world through the lens of Christianity.

Our faith is so relevant, and Bishop Barron helps you see how engaging with the culture, finding, seeds of the word” is an effective means of evangelizing.

I got this one for free as part of a Word On Fire promotional event and wasnt dissapointed.

I’m not sure I’d of paid for it though since much of its content can either be found on Barron’s website or in his videos. Still, it’s nice to have short, thought provoking, easily readable, essays from a Catholic perspective on popular topics gathered together in one book.

Excellent!

Bishop Barron is an excellent voice for the Catholic religion. As an individual who is dismayed by the secular shift in today’s world, I find comfort, reason, and hope in his words.

Another great book from Bishop Baron

Bishop Baron is the most effective Catholic evangelist today. His writing is clear and to the point.He tries to reach his audience where they can be found: in today’s culture. And he does so very effectively.

plus how through generations people have viewed Christ.

It brought a perspective to me of how to guide my thinking spiritually and everyday life. Grander view of being able to converse with other’s perspectives.

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About Robert Barron

Bishop Robert Emmet Barron is an acclaimed author, speaker, and theologian. He is the former Francis Cardinal George Professor of Faith and Culture at Mundelein Seminary near Chicago and also is the founder of Word On Fire (www.WordOnFire.org).

Bishop Barron is the creator and host of CATHOLICISM, a groundbreaking ten-part documentary series and study program about the Catholic faith. He is a passi Bishop Robert Emmet Barron is an acclaimed author, speaker, and theologian. He is the former Francis Cardinal George Professor of Faith and Culture at Mundelein Seminary near Chicago and also is the founder of Word On Fire (www.WordOnFire.org).

Bishop Barron is the creator and host of CATHOLICISM, a groundbreaking ten-part documentary series and study program about the Catholic faith. He is a passionate student of art, architecture, music and history, which he calls upon throughout his global travels in the making of the documentary.

Word On Fire programs are broadcast regularly on WGN America, Relevant Radio, CatholicTV, EWTN, the popular Word on Fire YouTube Channel, and the Word on Fire website, which offers daily blogs, articles, commentaries, and over ten years of weekly sermon podcasts. In 2010, Father Barron was the first priest to have a national show on a secular television network since the 1950s.

Fr. Barron received his Masters Degree in Philosophy from the Catholic University of America in Washington DC in 1982 and his doctorate in Sacred Theology from the Institut Catholique in 1992. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1986 and has been a professor of systematic theology at the nation’s largest Catholic seminary, the University of St. Mary of the Lake/Mundelein Seminary since 1992. He was visiting professor at the University of Notre Dame in 2002 and at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in 2007. He was also twice scholar in residence at the Pontifical North American College at the Vatican.

In addition, Fr. Barron lectures extensively in the United States and abroad. Cardinal Francis George calls Fr. Barron “one of the Church’s best messengers.

Fr. Barron was baptized at Queen of All Saints Basilica in Chicago and grew up at St. John of the Cross parish in Western Springs, Illinois.
WordOnFire.org – Fr. Barron’s website launched in 1999 and currently draws over 1 million visitors a year from every continent. Fr. Barron posts weekly video clips, commentaries and radio sermons and offers an audio archive of over 500 homilies. Podcasts of his sermons are widely used by tens of thousands of visitors each month.
TV – EWTN (The Eternal Word Television Network) and CatholicTV broadcasts Fr. Barron’s DVDs to a worldwide audience of over 150 million people.

Radio – Since 1999, Fr. Barron’s weekly Word on Fire program has been broadcast in Chicago (WGN) and throughout the country (Relevant Radio – 950 AM Chicago) to 28 million listeners in 17 states. Fr. Barron also is a regular commentator on the “Busted Halo Show” on the Sirius satellite radio network based in New York.

DVDs – Fr. Barron’s DVDs are used as powerful faith formation tools in universities, schools, churches and homes around the country. The series includes Seven Deadly Sins, Seven Lively Virtues; Faith Clips; Conversion: Following the Call of Christ; and Untold Blessing: Three Paths to Holiness.

YouTube – With over 180 online video commentaries by Fr. Barron, over 1 million viewers worldwide have made him the most popular of any evangelist on YouTube. These frequent, high-quality productions include brief and lively theological reviews of contemporary culture, including movies such as No Country for Old Men, Apocalypto, and The Departed, a three-part critical review of Christopher Hitchen’s book God is Not Great, The Discovery Channel’s The Jesus Tomb, the HBO series “The Sopranos”, “Rome” and more.

Missions – MISSION CHICAGO features evangelization lectures by Fr. Barron at the behest of Cardinal George. These special missions and presentations throughout the Archdiocese are centered in downtown Chicago and attract business, civic, and cultural leaders.
Books – His numerous books and essays serve as critical educational and inspirational tools for seminarians, priests, parishioners and young people worldwide. His published works are also central to the numerous retreats, workshop and talks that h . more

Seeds of the Word book. Read 30 reviews from the world’s largest community for readers. Since the first century, Christians have detected seeds of the W…