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weeds of north carolina

Weeds of north carolina

Curly dock
(Rumex crispus)

Curly dock is a perennial weed with a thick taproot. Leaves grow mostly at the base of the plant and are lance-shaped with wavy or curly margins. Leaf blades are 6 to 8 inches long and 1 to 2 inches wide. The green leaves may be tinged with reddish purple. Curly dock seldom produces seed in maintained turf. When the plants grow unchecked, small greenish flowers are produced in clusters at the top of the main stems. Flowers become reddish-brown at maturity. The shiny, reddish-brown triangular seed is surrounded by three sepals.

Common Pokeweed
(Phytolacca americana)

Cutleaf evening primrose
(Oenothera laciniata)

Cutleaf evening-primrose is a herbaceous weed that can grow to 28 inches tall. Often, the plant is upright, but the stems also recline and creep along the ground. The leaves are alternate, and toothed and lobed. The flowers are striking, and are yellow but sometimes have pink tinges to them. The flowers first appear in late spring and continue into early fall. Also unique is the elongated and curved seed pod located on the stems of the plant. Cutleaf evening primrose is found in fields, fencerows and waste areas, and is classified as a biennial, winter annual and sometimes a summer annual.

Maryland meadowbeauty
(Rhexia mariana)

Weeds of north carolina Curly dock (Rumex crispus) Curly dock is a perennial weed with a thick taproot. Leaves grow mostly at the base of the plant and are lance-shaped with wavy or curly

Weeds of north carolina

Chickweed – Winter annual weed, common in late fall to spring. May spread to large patches, small yellow flowers. Easily controlled with our weed control program. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Clover – Perennial weed, will not dieback with frost. Has white bloom, spreading ground cover. Easily controlled with our spring weed control applications. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Crabgrass – Common in the summer months if no pre-emergent is used. Wide blade, spreading along ground with tall seedheads. Clean up applications for new customers are effective but need to be done well in advance of seeding.

Dandelion – Perennial weed. Late spring until frost, may bloom all summer or spring and fall. Yellow flower turns to white seeds that are easily blown by wind. Easily controlled with our spring weed control applications. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Hairy bittercress – Winter annual weed, common in late fall to spring. Foliage is green to purplish, small white flowers, seeds will spring from plant when ripe looking like insects jumping just above grass. Easily controlled with our weed control program. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Henbit – Winter annual weed, late fall to spring. Purple flower, may get quit large. Easily controlled with our spring weed control applications. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Kylinga – Summer annual. Likes wet areas, looks like grass and is very hard to detect under some conditions. Has a very distinct odor. Treatments are very effective on this weed.

Lespedeza – Perennial weed. May grow upright or prostrate with pink to purple flowers. Treatments in the spring are effective but may take several to control.
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Nut Sedge – Perennial weed, likes wet areas but may grow anywhere. Grows much faster than grass, wide, shiny blade. Best treated a day or two before mowing so it is more noticeable, treatments are very effective but may take multiple application to control.

Wild onions/garlic – Both are perennial weeds from late summer to late spring. Growth is faster than grass and they have a very distinct smell when mowed or crushed. Easily controlled with our spring weed control applications. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.
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Hard to Control Weeds

Dallisgrass – This may be the most difficult weed to control in Tall Fescue lawns. Pre-emergent weed control is not effective against Dallisgrass and post emergent control is not very effective even with repeat applications. Digging out the plant, with the roots, may be the most effective control. Severe infestations may need to be treated with repeat applications of roundup to control.

Ground ivy – Perennial weed creeps along the ground and roots at nodes, leaves are round with scalloped edges. Flowers are blue to violet. Likes moist, shaded areas. Repeat applications of weed control offers only fair control. Improve sunlight and limit water to reduce encroachment of this weed.

Indian mock strawberry – Perennial weed that looks like and grows like strawberries. It spreads by stolons or runners on top of the ground. Likes moist, shaded areas. Repeat applications of weed control are needed to control. Improve sunlight and limit water to reduce encroachment of this weed.

Virginia buttonweed – Perennial weed, summer to early fall or frost/freeze. Very aggressive growth, green to mottled yellow foliage, shiny, waxy leaf, white flowers. Very difficult to control. Repeat applications needed at 4-6 week intervals.

Wild Violets – Perennial weed, heart shaped leaves, white to purple flower. Late summer to late spring/early summer, usually not so noticeable during summer heat. Very hard to control, most effective treatment is in the fall. Cannot treat in fall if seeding until new plants are matured to the point of 2-3 mowings.

Find out what weeds are encroaching on your lawn and put a stop to them now to ensure your lawn is robust and healthy.